Blogs

A Parent's Perspective

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

Therapy verbiage, protocols, advice, etc., can be very overwhelming, especially for parents just entering the world of therapy. A colleague of mine sent this link to me. I so appreciate this parent's wisdom and perspective.

http://keithandjackie.blogspot.com/2013/01/lets-talk-therapy.html?utm_so...

Casting Out an Anchor

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

Thinking about my responsibility of stewarding children that are not mine by parental rights, I can sometimes honestly choose very easily to cower away from the responsibility to earnestly take hold of the opportunity to teach them in the ways that are right and true. Nurturing children by ways of taking care of their physical needs are relatively easy. Applying my knowledge in my field of occupational therapy and experience with children in an educational environment is comfortable and automatic.

Screen Media's NEGATIVE Effects On Children

Cindy Young's picture

I know that I am considered "older" (OUCH) since I am now 53  and many of you might say I am old fashioned and not hip to the new way of thinking that every child needs movies in their car, their own iPad with play apps, and constant iPhone interaction.  I personally use all of the screen media mentioned ~ I live the iLife and love it.  But I have got to voice a BIG concern over how our young children are being raised in a media-saturated environment.

Sensational Holiday Experiences, For Your “Sensational” Child

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

     Ah…tis the season to be jolly, possibly a little overwhelmed, most likely busy, and genuinely tired! Commercials have begun to abound the television with scenes of Thanksgiving meals, family gatherings, presents, shopping, and Christmas tunes playing in the background.  Winter weather, well…not sure yet, at least for our area, but no doubt the days will get colder, just as daylight savings has already delivered less daylight hours.

Overcoming the Storms

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

This past week we ventured out to Maumelle Park to take our students camping. We knew that there was a possibility of rain and possibly thunderstorms. However, we were determined to continue on with the plans. Hours of packing, practicing campfire songs, pre-teaching campfire and campsite safety, and planning our meals were all part of the hype in leaving for the overnight trip. 

Please STOP screaming!!--Sensory Processing Disorder Subtypes

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

Sensory Processing Disorder is categorized into 3 subtypes:  Sensory Modulation Disorder, Sensory-Based Motor Disorder, and Sensory Discrimination Disorder.  

Sensory Modulation Disorders are typically the most identifiable types of SPD noted by teachers and parents due to their behavioral responses.  There are three distinct types of Sensory Modulation Disorders:

Celebrating National Sensory Awareness Month! How do I get a referral for services for my child if I suspect SPD?

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

 

How do I get a referral for services for my child if I suspect SPD? Finding services and the right kind of help for your child with SPD can be very overwhelming, time consuming, and frustrating. Some parents are met with the initial roadblock of teachers, psychologists, and physicians not recognizing SPD and its impact on the child’s school and home life.  It may take months or even years to convince health professionals that there is something going on with your child.

What is Sensory Processing Disorder?

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

 

What is sensory processing disorder and how do I know if my child has it?  According to the SPD Foundation, sensory processing (sometimes called "sensory integration" or SI) is a term that refers to the way the nervous system receives messages from the senses and turns them into appropriate motor and behavioral responses. Whether you are biting into a hamburger, riding a bicycle, or reading a book, your successful completion of the activity requires processing sensation or "sensory integration."

 

If my child has SPD, how do I know what are behavioral problems and what are sensory issues?

Suzanne Fullerton's picture

 

If my child has SPD, how do I know what are behavioral problems and what are sensory issues? This is a perplexing and challenging question, and not just for parents. Educators in schools, grandparents, and even some therapists struggle with this issue. It seems so often to have two polar opposite reactions:

One: the reaction built on unawareness or lack of acceptance of SPD being a real, physiological diagnosis which results in the conclusion that the child misbehaves because the parents have no control

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